Fatal claims

Inquests

How can we help?

When someone dies and their death is sudden or unexplained, an Inquest might be held to establish the facts surrounding their death, such as where and how the death occurred. It is a daunting prospect, attending an Inquest by yourself especially if the other parties have legal representation. As experts in the Inquest process, we can make sure that you are not alone; we can guide you through this difficult time with sensitivity and advice you can trust. We are here to listen to your concerns so we can fight your corner and get the answers that you need to understand what went wrong with your loved one’s medical treatment or in an accident that caused their death.

Compensation claims

At the same time as representing you at an Inquest, we can also help you to bring a claim for compensation if your loved one’s death was avoidable. No amount of money is ever going to bring back a loved one that has passed away due to negligence or an accident but we can help ease some of the financial burdens by obtaining compensation, investigate the claim to help you understand what happened, hold individual professionals to account and raise standards so that no one else has to go through what has happened to you.

What should you do next?

We are happy to act on a no win no fee basis so if you would like our help at this difficult time, contact our expert team to discuss your fatal claim and the tragic circumstances of your loved one’s death.

Frequently Asked Questions

In the UK, an inquest is a legal investigation into the cause of a person’s death. The timing of an inquest can vary depending on a number of factors, such as the complexity of the case, the availability of witnesses, and the workload of the coroner’s office.

Generally, an inquest must be held within six months of the death, although in some cases it may take longer. If the investigation is particularly complex or involves a criminal investigation, the inquest may be postponed until the criminal investigation has concluded.

It’s worth noting that the timeframe for holding an inquest can be subject to change due to various factors, and the length of time between the death and the inquest can vary. However, the coroner’s office will usually inform the next of kin of the deceased about the expected timeline for the inquest to be held.

In the UK, an inquest is a legal investigation into the cause of a person’s death. An inquest is triggered when the death is considered sudden, violent, or unnatural. The following are some of the circumstances that may trigger an inquest:

  1. Deaths in custody: When a person dies while in police custody, prison, or a psychiatric hospital.

  2. Work-related deaths: When a person dies as a result of an accident or injury that occurred while working.

  3. Road traffic accidents: When a person dies as a result of a road traffic accident.

  4. Suicides: When a person takes their own life.

  5. Suspicious deaths: When there is suspicion that the death may be due to foul play or criminal activity.

  6. Medical-related deaths: When a person dies as a result of medical treatment or surgery, and the cause of death is unclear.

  7. Stillbirths and infant deaths: When a stillbirth or infant death occurs.

The coroner’s office will determine whether an inquest is required based on the circumstances surrounding the death. If an inquest is deemed necessary, the coroner will investigate the cause of death and may call witnesses to give evidence. The aim of an inquest is to establish the facts surrounding the death and provide answers for the deceased’s family and friends.

In the UK, the family of the deceased can request an inquest, but they cannot insist on one. However, the coroner’s office will take the family’s wishes into account when deciding whether to hold an inquest.

If the family requests an inquest, they should provide the coroner with as much information as possible about the circumstances surrounding the death. The coroner will then consider whether an inquest is necessary based on the information provided and other factors, such as the cause of death and whether it was sudden, violent, or unnatural.

It’s worth noting that the coroner has the ultimate discretion to decide whether an inquest is necessary, and the decision is based on the individual circumstances of the case. If the coroner decides not to hold an inquest, the family may request a review of the decision through the courts.

The length of an inquest in court can vary depending on a number of factors, such as the complexity of the case, the number of witnesses and evidence to be presented, and the workload of the coroner’s office.

In general, an inquest can take anywhere from a few hours to several weeks or even months. Simple cases may be concluded in a day, while more complex cases involving multiple witnesses, expert reports, and legal arguments may take longer.

The coroner’s office will usually provide an estimate of how long the inquest is expected to take, and the date and time of the hearing will be communicated to the family of the deceased and any other interested parties. It’s important to note that the inquest is not a criminal trial, but rather an inquiry into the cause and circumstances of the death. Therefore, the length of the inquest will depend on the complexity of the case and the amount of evidence that needs to be considered.

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Experts in getting the answers and compensation you deserve

We make the legal side of things as easy and worry-free for you as possible during some of the most traumatic times in your life. We concentrate on getting the answers you deserve, find out why it happened and how we can help make sure it wont happen again.

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